A Book on Legal Books at the Dawn of the Digital Age (and its Price)

 

By J. (Pim) Oosterhuis

Half a year ago, The Formation and Transmission of Western Legal Culture – 150 Books that Made the Law in the Age of Printing came out with Springer (http://www.springer.com/la/book/9783319455648), the fruit of an ambitious project on legal books in the age of printing. The appeal of the work is that it not only contains entries on 150 groundbreaking legal books, but also introductory essays placing developments in context. Three periods are distinguished, namely Law Books During the Transition from Late-Medieval to Early-Modern Legal Scholarship (chapter 2), Legal Books in the Early Modern Western World (chapter 3) and Law Books in the Modern Western World: Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (chapter 4).

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The UK and European Private Law, what’s next?

In the past I have reported on this forum about a simulation that William Bull and I run with Maastricht European Law School Students called the Maastricht Project. In this project, which runs in our course on European Private Law (focusing on contract, property and a bit of tort), we divide students amongst Member State delegations, the European Commission, a presidency and a fictive institute of European Institutional Economics (with the specific aim to bring economic arguments forward). We then run a 7-week negotiation simulation with our students in which we simulate a Council of the EU working group. Students play the role of delegate members and debate a fictive proposal on EU private law, made by the European Commission delegation students. For this, students borrow from the CESL, DCFR and Digital Assets proposals of the European Commission.

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‘Flawed Strategies to Reducing Labor Exploitations’, 17 May 2017, PhD defense by Mark Kawakami

The main question that this thesis addressed was what private actors – from the companies to the consumers and even the laborers themselves – can do differently than what they are currently doing to further reduce instances of labor exploitation taking place in the global supply chain. To answer this question, this thesis first offered a descriptive overview of popular legal instruments and strategies that private actors are currently employing by relying on labor/employment law, tort law, company law, and contract law. This descriptive overview also addressed various semi- or non-legal instruments and initiatives with the intended aim of reducing labor exploitations as well such as corporate social responsibility initiatives and ethical consumerism campaigns.

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Is there such a thing as ‘European Private Law’?

 

By Professor Jaap C. Hage

Is there such a thing as ‘European private law’? In my opinion there is not, just as there is no Dutch, French, English, or Chinese private law. Let me explain. Legal rules, including rules of private law, have many characteristics. They have a content, a scope, many of them were created by some agent, and many of them are applied and enforced by law-enforcing agents, with a prominent role for the judiciary. None of these characteristics can be used to classify some legal rules as rules of European private law.

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Re- De- Co-dification? New Insights on the Codification of Private Law in Europe

M-EPLI Roundtable on May 12th 2017

The Roundtable will address recent developments and new perspectives on the codification of private law from a comparative law viewpoint. Scholars from six jurisdictions from Europe will share their insights on the main alterations and challenges that the codification phenomenon has experienced since the beginning of the twenty-first century. Speakers from continental European, common law, and mixed jurisdictions will meet to assess the virtues and weaknesses of the codification phenomenon, thus offering a forum to discuss the status of a paradigm that spread across part of the Western world.

For registration please contact Lars van Vliet at l.vanvliet@maastrichtuniversity.nl.

 

Organization

The event is part of the Roundtable Series of the Maastricht European Private Law Institute (M-EPLI), and is organized by Lars van Vliet (l.vanvliet@maastrichtuniversity.nl) and Agustí­n Parise. Funds for the realization of the event were provided by the Science Committee of the Faculty of Law of Maastricht University and the University Fund Limburg.

 

Location

Tapijnkazerne 21 ‘Building Z’, 6211 ME Maastricht

 

Programme

09:00 Opening Remarks, Lars van Vliet (Maastricht University)

 

First Session
Moderator: Bram Akkermans (Maastricht University)

09:05 William Swadling (University of Oxford, England)
Perspectives from England
09:25 Discussion

09:40 Martin A. Hogg (Edinburgh Law School, Scotland)
Perspectives from Scotland
10:00 Discussion

10:15 Jan Smits (Maastricht University)
Perspectives from the Netherlands
10:35 Discussion

10:50 Coffee Break

 

Second Session
Moderator: Lotte Meurkens (Maastricht University)

11:15 Monika Hinteregger (Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz, Austria)
Perspectives from Austria
11:35 Discussion

11:50 Vincent Sagaert (KU Leuven, Belgium)
Perspectives from Belgium
12:10 Discussion

12:25 Mustapha Mekki (Université Paris XIII, IRDA, France)
Perspectives from France
12:45 Discussion

13:00 General Discussion, moderated by Gijs van Dijck (Maastricht University)

13:15 Closing Remarks, Agustín Parise (Maastricht University)

13:30 Lunch (Faculty of Law, Bouillonstraat 1-3, 6211 LH Maastricht)

 

For registration please contact Lars van Vliet at l.vanvliet@maastrichtuniversity.nl.

 

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The Unitary Patent Package and Brexit: A sign of things to come?

And so it’s official: Last week Theresa May finally submitted the UK’s Article 50 exit notification, thereby triggering for the first time the formal process of leaving the EU that was only laid down (ironically enough) with the last major revision of the founding treaties, amidst continued Conservative party infighting and the prospect of a second Scottish referendum looming large.

Unlike some of my colleagues, I chose not to express my views on the Brexit referendum in this forum at the time the result became apparent, partly because this is a family blog, but also because my overriding feeling was one of resignation. I did not feel the need to question the level of understanding or motives of those who, unlike myself, voted to leave, nor particularly to connect the vote to a more general populist sentiment sweeping the continent, or even the world. That is not necessarily to say there is no truth to this, but my own thoughts were much closer to home.

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